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US Senate Presents A Different Take On Tax Reform

Westchester NY accountant Paul Herman of Herman & Company CPA’s is here for all your financial needs. Please contact us if you have questions, and to receive your free personal finance consultation!

by Mike Godfrey, Tax-News.com, Washington

The Senate Finance Committee released its tax reform plan on November 9, presenting a draft bill with marked differences to that agreed by the House Ways and Means Committee on the same day.

The proposal was drafted by Finance Committee Republicans under the leadership of Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-UT), based on the Unified Tax Framework agreed by the Trump Administration, the House Committee on Ways and Means, and the Senate Committee on Finance in September 2017.

While said to adopt a similar “pro-growth approach” to the House Ways and Means proposal, the Senate plan differs in a number of areas.

The Senate bill would preserve the current seven income tax brackets, compared to the reduced four brackets proposed under the House bill. Under the Senate proposal, the zero tax bracket would be expanded, and a slightly lower 38.5 percent tax rate would be introduced for high-income earners (compared with 39.6 percent in the House Bill, in line with current law).

Both the Senate and House bills include a proposal to double the standard deduction, to USD12,000 for individuals and USD24,000 for married couples; to repeal the Alternative Minimum Tax; and eliminate the state and local tax deductions. Where the House bill would repeal the medical expense deduction, the Senate bill would retain it.

The treatment of the Child Tax Credit is also largely similar in both bills, with the Senate proposing to increase the credit from USD1,000 to USD1,650 (compared to USD1,600 in the House Bill). However, the Senate Bill would preserve the existing mortgage interest deduction, which the House Bill proposes to curb from USD1m to USD500,000.

The Senate bill also proposes to preserve the estate tax, which the House Bill would repeal for persons dying after 2024. The Senate bill also proposes to double both the estate and gift tax exemption for individuals, from USD5m to USD10m.

For businesses, the Senate Bill would also cut the corporate tax cut from 35 percent to 20 percent, but would delay implementation until January 2019. The bill proposes a new 17.4 percent deduction for certain pass-through businesses, which are taxed under the personal income tax regime, and enhanced Section 179 expensing. There is an exclusion from the deduction for specified service businesses, except in the case of a taxpayer whose taxable income does not exceed USD150,000, for married individuals filing jointly, or USD75,000 for other individuals.

The Senate Bill would tax multinationals’ offshore holdings under a repatriation tax proposal at lower rates than under the House bill. Cash holdings would be subject to a repatriation tax of five percent, rather than seven percent under the House proposal, and at 10 percent on non-cash holdings, rather than 14 percent as under the House proposal.

Both bills would cap the deduction for net interest expenses at 30 percent of adjusted taxable income, with exclusions for small businesses.

“This is just the start of the legislative process in the Senate. We expect robust committee debate on the policies in this bill, will have an open amendment process, and hope to report legislation by the end of next week,” said Hatch.

Trump Looks To Democrats To Shore Up Tax Reform Push

Westchester NY accountant Paul Herman of Herman & Company CPA’s is here for all your financial needs. Please contact us if you have questions, and to receive your free personal finance consultation!

by Mike Godfrey, Tax-News.com, Washington

 US President Donald Trump has reached out to Democrat lawmakers to discuss tax reform, in a bid to obtain bipartisan support to get a package through Congress.

The President met with senators Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND), Joe Donnelly (D-ID), and Joe Manchin (D-WV) over dinner on September 12 to discuss possible support for a tax reform bill.

“I will tell you, for the tax bill, I would be very surprised if I don’t have at least a few Democrats,” Trump told reporters following the dinner.

The White House and Congress have so far failed to propose a joint comprehensive tax plan, despite months of negotiations. Trump has indicated that, if some members of the Republican party hold back reform, he may try to instead bring on board Democrat lawmakers to push through a bipartisan bill.

It’s Benefits Enrollment Time – Know the difference between Health Care Accounts

Westchester NY accountant Paul Herman of Herman & Company CPA’s is here for all your financial needs. Please contact us if you have questions, and to receive your free personal finance consultation!

Understanding the Differences Between Health Care Accounts

Health care costs continue to be in the news and on everyone’s mind. As a result, tax-friendly ways to pay for these expenses are very much in play for many people. The three primary players, so to speak, are Health Savings Accounts (HSAs), Flexible Spending Arrangements (FSAs) and Health Reimbursement Arrangements (HRAs).

All provide opportunities for tax-advantaged funding of health care expenses. But what’s the difference between these three types of accounts? Here’s an overview of each one:

HSAs. If you’re covered by a qualified high-deductible health plan (HDHP), you can contribute pretax income to an employer-sponsored HSA — or make deductible contributions to an HSA you set up yourself — up to $3,400 for self-only coverage and $6,750 for family coverage for 2017. Plus, if you’re age 55 or older, you may contribute an additional $1,000.

You own the account, which can bear interest or be invested, growing tax-deferred similar to an IRA. Withdrawals for qualified medical expenses are tax-free, and you can carry over a balance from year to year.

FSAs. Regardless of whether you have an HDHP, you can redirect pretax income to an employer-sponsored FSA up to an employer-determined limit — not to exceed $2,600 in 2017. The plan pays or reimburses you for qualified medical expenses.

What you don’t use by the plan year’s end, you generally lose — though your plan might allow you to roll over up to $500 to the next year. Or it might give you a 2½-month grace period to incur expenses to use up the previous year’s contribution. If you have an HSA, your FSA is limited to funding certain “permitted” expenses.

HRAs. An HRA is an employer-sponsored arrangement that reimburses you for medical expenses. Unlike an HSA, no HDHP is required. Unlike an FSA, any unused portion typically can be carried forward to the next year. And there’s no government-set limit on HRA contributions. But only your employer can contribute to an HRA; employees aren’t allowed to contribute.

Please bear in mind that these plans could be affected by health care or tax legislation. Contact our firm for the latest information, as well as to discuss these and other ways to save taxes in relation to your health care expenses.

 

Any U.S. tax advice contained in the body of this website is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by the recipient for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed under the Internal Revenue Code or applicable state or local tax law provisions.