Reading Between the Numbers . . . Providing Knowledge, Insight, Experience and Creativity for our Clients' Benefit.

Visit our blog frequently to read our take on developments and news about taxes, accounting, financial and retirement planning.

3 Essential Tips for Financial Planning When You Have a Disability

Having a disability is not quite as rare as many people think. In fact, about 14 percent of adults around the world have a disability of some kind. This includes people who have a physical, mental, intellectual, or sensory limitation at a mild, severe, or moderate level. Also, these disabilities could have happened at birth, in old age, or anywhere in between.

ss-young-woman-in-wheelchair-working-with-a-male-colleague-81311647_630x460

One thing that remains consistent across all forms of disability, however, is that life generally costs more money for those who have them. Normal expenses such as medical care and food, as well as additional costs such as modified housing and assistive devices and technology, can put a major burden on those with disabilities. That’s why it’s essential to have a financial plan in place. If you have a disability, these three tips will help you prepare and form the financial skills it takes to live your best life, both now and in the future.

Consider Life Insurance

One of the first things you should do when planning your finances is to look into life insurance. If you get a policy that benefits your current situation, it could provide significantly for your family if you were to pass away unexpectedly. And life insurance can help cover things like medical expenses, funeral expenses, and lost income. Moreover, shopping for life insurance is fairly straightforward nowadays, as you can easily purchase it online and use online calculators to figure out the coverage you need.

Set a Budget

Much of your financial planning comes down to making a budget. Not only will your budget serve as a guideline for your spending and saving, the process of making a budget will teach you a lot about your financial situation and the steps you can take to grow. If you’re on a fixed income, start with how much you bring in each month. If you are able to work or already have a job, where does that put your monthly income?

Once you factor in your income, write down all of your expenses; include everything you can think of. This might include normal monthly expenses such as your mortgage payment, home and auto insurance, utilities, food, entertainment, gas, etc. Also, consider your medical expenses: How much do you spend on medical care, assistive devices, or any other medical-related expenses? Furthermore, include any credit card debt you want to pay off.

Once you get these basic costs on paper, see where you stand concerning your income and expenses. Then you can determine what you can cut (entertainment, miscellaneous items, etc,) if necessary. Also, be sure to research all your options when it comes to financial assistance.

Build an Emergency Fund

As it is with anyone, saving money is important when you have a disability. Once you figure out your budget, determine how much you can put away in savings. Building an emergency fund will create a safety net in the event that something unexpected happens — whether it’s a medical incident, major home or car repair, or any other kind of sudden expense. Decide on a set amount to put into a cash jar or savings account, and stick to it as close as you can.

There may be many expenses that come with a disability, but that doesn’t mean you can’t navigate them and make a plan that meets your needs and sets you up to be cared for later in life. Work through your finances and set a budget to guide you through your spending and saving. Find the best life insurance plan for you and your family, and start building an emergency fund today. Being financially prepared will help you overcome a lot of challenges and put you in a better position to live a fulfilling life.

 Written by Ed Carter

4 Ways to Pay Less Taxes on Your Investments

If you’re considering jumping into investing (or have already started), you need to know the tactics to avoid paying massive amounts of taxes on them. We’ve compiled a list of tax tips for investors. Check them out.

by Austin Distel

Hold investments for longer than a year

Whenever you make money off your investments (aka capital gains) you are taxed on that income. However, the length of time you held the investment dictates the rate you’ll be taxed at.

These taxes, called capital gains taxes, change at the year mark. If you hold your investments for a year or less, you’ll be taxed at the short term capital gains rate, which is the same rate as income tax.

But if you hold your investments for a year and a day, you’ll get taxed at a more manageable long-term capital gains rate.

This rate can get as high as 20% for big earners, but it’s more likely you’ll pay somewhere between 0 and 15%.

Buy Municipal Bonds  

Buying bonds means you get to collect interest on those bonds, which is a great source of passive income if you buy enough.

But unless you buy municipal bonds, the IRS is entitled to a share of that interest. When you buy either city, state, or county bonds, you are exempt from paying federal income tax on those bonds. If you buy municipal bonds in your home state, you’ll be exempt from state and local taxes as well.

One thing to note is that if you sell your municipal bonds for a profit, you’ll have to pay taxes on the gain.

Sell Losing Investments   

If you’re losing money on a particular investment, you might want to consider selling it off.  Investment losses offset capital gains, so if you make $2,000 and lose the same amount, you won’t have to pay on the amount you’ve lost.

In addition, if your investment losses exceed your gains, you can use them to offset up to $3,000 in taxable income.

Put Your Money in Tax Sheltered Accounts  

Putting your investment money into tax-sheltered accounts is a great way to defer paying taxes on various investments.

Accounts like 401(k)s, 403(b)s, and certain IRA plans aren’t tax-free, but you won’t have to worry about paying taxes until you start making withdrawals. By the time you do that (barring some emergency), you’ll likely be in a lower tax bracket anyway.

 

Have more questions about investments and taxes? Shoot us an email or give us a call.

Important Dates In Post-Revolution American Tax History

The Revolutionary War was sparked in part by the British imposing taxes on the American colonists without their permission or consent.

Once the colonists had freed themselves from British rule, it was time to establish a government that could pay the debts it had incurred during the conflict.

Photo by Patrick Fore on Unsplash

Photo by Patrick Fore on Unsplash

1777 – Articles of Confederation

This was the first constitution of the newly formed United State. It favored decentralization of power, which means that Congress was not given the power to tax.

1781  – Report on Public Credit

Robert Morris, Superintendent of finance, wanted the federal government to own the debt it incurred then issue interest-bearing debt certificates while imposing tariffs and internal taxes.

His proposal was shut down by numerous states over the next few years.

1787 – Ratification of the Constitution

The ratification of the Constitution shifted the focus of power to the federal government and away from individual states.

This gave the federal legislature the power to impose tariffs and coin money, along with the flexibility to collect excises and levy taxes directly on individual citizens.

1789 – Tariff of 1789

This tax bill included the original 5% duty on imports, as well as a list of special items that would be taxed at specific amounts.

1790 – Report on Public Credit

This new tax plan worked on two basic principles:

  • Redemption – Congress would redeem at face value all the securities issued by the Confederation government. These old notes would be exchanged for new government securities with interest of about 4%. This plan aimed to intertwine the wealthy Americans who had financed the initial government with the new government.

  • Assumption – The national government would take on outstanding war debts of the states. This would concentrate the nation wealth into the hands of the wealthy merchant class so they would be able to invest in the nation’s economy and other critical innovations.

1791 – Whiskey Excise Tax

This was a tax specifically for spirit distillers and imposed a 7 cents to 18 cent per gallon tax. This was not a popular tax, as spirits were often used as a form of currency out west.

1794 – Uprising Quelled

North Carolina and Western Pennsylvania were in a state of civil unrest after being cited by the federal government for dodging taxes.

The federal government forced the states to send militia to occupy these territories and take down any organized resistance.

President Madison appealed to Congress for a Declaration of War against Britain as the tension between the two countries reached a head.

There was a lot of conflict over fundraising for the war, but Congress eventually settled on doubling the tariff schedule.

 

Any U.S. tax advice contained in the body of this website is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by the recipient for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed under the Internal Revenue Code or applicable state or local tax law provisions.