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1099, W2, W4, W9 – what’s the difference?

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Fill out this 1099 form. Did you get your W2 from your employer? Fill out this W4 form.

Keeping all the tax forms straight is a challenge. In today’s post, we go through the difference between the most commonly filled out tax forms. That way, you know what you’re signing and why.

Form W4

This is the form that you fill out at the beginning of most conventional employment. The purpose of this paper is to let your employer know how much tax money they should withhold from your paycheck. You can also use this form to adjust your withholdings throughout the year.

Form W2

This is the magical form most of us are waiting on to get started with our taxes. It shows your yearly income and how much was withheld – critical information for both you and your accountant.

Form 1099  

This is a form you receive in any non-conventional payment situation. Basically, if you make money as an independent contractor or self-employed taxpayer, you will receive a version of this form.

If you are working as a contractor, business, or have received money from the government, bank, etc, you will likely get one of these. There are a lot of versions of this form, including:

  • MISC, Miscellaneous Income

  • G, Certain Government Payments

  • K, Payment Card and Third Party Network Transactions

  • R, Distributions From Pensions, Annuities, Retirement or Profit-Sharing Plans, IRAs, Insurance Contracts, etc.

  • DIV, Dividends and Distributions

  • INT, Interest Income

Form 1098

There are a few versions of this form from income or payments to institutions like universities and banks. The most common forms of these are:

  • 1098-E, Student Loan Interest Statement

  • 1098-T,  Tuition Statement

  • Mortgage Interest Statement

Schedule K-1

This form reports any income, deductions, or other tax items you might receive as part of a business partnership. You will usually have to wait until later in the tax season to receive this form.

Have a form that’s not covered here? Reach out to us.

Are you withholding enough from your taxes?

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In a prior article, we talk about how moonlighters (those with 1099s and a W2 job) might need to withhold more taxes from their W2 role to avoid owing for the 2019 year.

They aren’t the only ones. Retirees, those with dependents, and a handful of others will need to take a look at how much they’re withholding and adjust accordingly.

Basically, if you were surprised at how low your refund was this year, you might need to adjust your withholding amount. That means if your refund was low or you owed (and never did before) you need to prioritize your withholding amount.

The time to adjust is now, right after the April 15 tax preparation deadline. The longer you wait, the more likely it is that you’ll owe or get a low tax refund amount. This can mostly be done with the IRS withholding calculator, but you’ll likely need to talk to an accountant for proper withholding.

This is for two reasons:

  • State and local taxes aren’t calculated.
  • Without a full understanding of taxes, taxpayers may not fill out the calculator correctly.

Reach out to a tax professional. They’ll help you navigate the muddy waters that were caused by the latest tax bill change.

Additionally, the IRS is cooking up a new W4 form - the form you fill out at the beginning of conventional employment (where you’d receive a W2) or to adjust your withholding amount. It will be ready for the 2020 tax season and won’t affect this year’s taxes.

If you ended up owing in this year or had a small tax refund, reach out to us. We can help ensure you’re withholding enough.

How Moonlighters Can Get Enough Tax Money Withheld

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If you were left surprised (and maybe a little hurt) from your latest tax return and you work as both a W2 employee and have 1099 side gigs, this article is for you.

The Current State of the Side Hustle

The side hustle is a common part of our society today. The latest figures say that nearly 40 percent of Americans have a side job that brings in $8,200 or more each year.

People who work a side job are more likely to be millennials, apparently working more than one job is something that is less common as you age.

And while the extra money is nice, these side hustles make it that much more complicated to do your yearly taxes. If you make more than $600 at any job, that money is taxable.

That’s why its good to get a head start by adjusting your W2 withholdings to help cover the income from your side hustles. Otherwise, you’ll undoubtedly owe

How Do You Do This?

The recent tax law changes impacted many taxpayers, so the IRS created a withholding calculator.

It’s an easy-to-use tool, you just need to come prepared with the proper paperwork.

That includes:

  • Any and all recent pay stubs and invoices(make sure it includes the amount of federal taxes withheld for this year so far
  • A completed copy of your 2018 and 2017 returns

Then open the calculator and answer all the questions. You may not be happy with the amount of taxes you have taken out, but you’ll happier come tax time, so you won’t owe for all your hard work in 2019.

Any U.S. tax advice contained in the body of this website is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by the recipient for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed under the Internal Revenue Code or applicable state or local tax law provisions.