Monthly Archives: February 2020

Tax Prep Checklist: 6 Types of Documentation to Bring to Your Accountant This Tax Season

checklist-3693113_1280

You’ve found the perfect accountant for your taxes. They understand your tax situation, what you need, and are willing to help.  

But what do you need to bring for your appointment? The longer it takes for an accountant to prepare your taxes, the more money it will cost you.

You might as well be prepared and ensure you have every single piece of paperwork and documentation that you need to before you walk into an accountant’s office.    

Here’s a checklist of what you should bring:  

Proper Identification 

To be safe, bring both a valid photo ID and your Social Security card. Your accountant, especially if this is the first time they’re preparing your taxes for you, will need to verify your Social Security number, the spelling of your name, and that the card you bring is in fact you. 

You will also need to bring the Social Security cards/numbers of any dependents you’re claiming and that of your spouse (if you have one).  

Copy of Your Most Recent Tax Return 

Be sure to bring your most recent tax return to the office. This gives your accountant vital information that they’ll need to file your taxes. 

Wage Statements and Income  

There are many ways to make money and only some of them come with accompanying forms. The two most common that you’ll encounter are Form W-2 and a variety of different Form 1099s.  

Check out this complete list of different wage forms you might receive (and therefore should bring to your accountant’s office):

  • Form W-2 (wage and salary income)

  • Form W-2G (gambling winnings)

  • Form 1099-A (foreclosure of a home)

  • Form 1099-B (sales of stock, bonds, or other investments)

  • Form 1099-C (canceled debts)

  • Form 1099-DIV (dividends)

  • Form 1099-G (state tax refunds and unemployment compensation)

  • Form 1099-INT (interest income)

  • Form 1099-K (business or rental income processed by third-party networks)

  • Form 1099-LTC (benefits received from a long-term care policy)

  • Form 1099-MISC (self-employment and other various types of income)

  • Form 1099-OID (original issue discount on bonds)

  • Form 1099-PATR (patronage dividends)

  • Form 1099-Q (distributions from an education savings plan)

  • Form 1099-QA (distributions from an ABLE account)

  • Form 1099-R (distributions from individual retirement accounts, 401(k) plans, and other types of retirement savings plans)

  • Form 1099-S (proceeds from the sale of real estate)

  • Form 1099-SA (distributions from health savings accounts)

  • Form SSA-1099 (Social Security benefits)

  • Form RRB-1099 (Railroad retirement benefits)

  • Schedule K-1 (income from partnerships, S corporations, estates, or trusts)

Additionally, there is a possibility you might have income that won’t be reported on a form. This includes small businesses where a client might pay you $500 for a service. You won’t have signed a form with them, but that doesn’t mean you don’t have to report the income. 

Bring proof of that income when you go to the accountant’s office. 

Real Estate Documents 

Do you own a home or piece of property? There are a lot of deductions you can take if so. You should bring any documentation that includes: 

  • A recent home purchase 

  • A home equity loan  

  • Proof of paid real estate or property taxes  

 

 Proof of Expenses

If you’re planning to itemize your deductions, you need to determine all of your expenses.  

Try to keep it organized but bring everything you think you might need. You’ll want records of: 

  • Receipts 

  • Invoices 

  • Medical bill 

  • Charitable contributions 

  • Expenses related to job-hunting 

  • Mileage logs  

  • Education expenses 

  • Self-employment expenses 

  • Gambling losses 

  • Child care expenses  

  • Moving expenses  

  • Personal property taxes  

  • Real estate tax bills  

  • And more 

Be thorough. It’s better to have more tax documents than less. 

If you want to get your deductions and credits, it’s imperative that you hand over documentation that proves your expenses. This includes receipts, invoices, medical bills, charitable contributions, IRA contributions, job-hunting expenses, mileage logs, education expenses, self-employment expenses, and more. It’s better to bring too much documentation than too little.

Direct Deposit Authorization Form or a Blank Check 

This ensures that when your accountant e-files on your behalf that they are able to directly deposit any federal or state returns. 

 

That’s it! You’re now ready to save yourself time and money by heading to your accountant’s office completely prepared. Make sure you go to a certified CPA accountant to ensure that your taxes are done properly and that you get the maximum potential return. 

You’ve found the perfect accountant for your taxes. They understand your tax situation, what you need, and are willing to help.  

 

But what do you need to bring for your appointment? The longer it takes for an accountant to prepare your taxes, the more money it will cost you.

 

You might as well be prepared and ensure you have every single piece of paperwork and documentation that you need to before you walk into an accountant’s office.    

 

Here’s a checklist of what you should bring:  

 

Proper Identification 

To be safe, bring both a valid photo ID and your Social Security card. Your accountant, especially if this is the first time they’re preparing your taxes for you, will need to verify your Social Security number, the spelling of your name, and that the card you bring is in fact you. 

 

You will also need to bring the Social Security cards/numbers of any dependents you’re claiming and that of your spouse (if you have one).  

 

Copy of Your Most Recent Tax Return 

Be sure to bring your most recent tax return to the office. This gives your accountant vital information that they’ll need to file your taxes. 

 

Wage Statements and Income  

There are many ways to make money and only some of them come with accompanying forms. The two most common that you’ll encounter are Form W-2 and a variety of different Form 1099s.  

 

Check out this complete list of different wage forms you might receive (and therefore should bring to your accountant’s office):

  • Form W-2 (wage and salary income)

  • Form W-2G (gambling winnings)

  • Form 1099-A (foreclosure of a home)

  • Form 1099-B (sales of stock, bonds, or other investments)

  • Form 1099-C (canceled debts)

  • Form 1099-DIV (dividends)

  • Form 1099-G (state tax refunds and unemployment compensation)

  • Form 1099-INT (interest income)

  • Form 1099-K (business or rental income processed by third-party networks)

  • Form 1099-LTC (benefits received from a long-term care policy)

  • Form 1099-MISC (self-employment and other various types of income)

  • Form 1099-OID (original issue discount on bonds)

  • Form 1099-PATR (patronage dividends)

  • Form 1099-Q (distributions from an education savings plan)

  • Form 1099-QA (distributions from an ABLE account)

  • Form 1099-R (distributions from individual retirement accounts, 401(k) plans, and other types of retirement savings plans)

  • Form 1099-S (proceeds from the sale of real estate)

  • Form 1099-SA (distributions from health savings accounts)

  • Form SSA-1099 (Social Security benefits)

  • Form RRB-1099 (Railroad retirement benefits)

  • Schedule K-1 (income from partnerships, S corporations, estates, or trusts)

Additionally, there is a possibility you might have income that won’t be reported on a form. This includes small businesses where a client might pay you $500 for a service. You won’t have signed a form with them, but that doesn’t mean you don’t have to report the income. 

 

Bring proof of that income when you go to the accountant’s office. 

 

Real Estate Documents 

Do you own a home or piece of property? There are a lot of deductions you can take if so. You should bring any documentation that includes: 

  • A recent home purchase 

  • A home equity loan  

  • Proof of paid real estate or property taxes  

 

 Proof of Expenses

If you’re planning to itemize your deductions, you need to determine all of your expenses.  

 

Try to keep it organized but bring everything you think you might need. You’ll want records of: 

  • Receipts 

  • Invoices 

  • Medical bill 

  • Charitable contributions 

  • Expenses related to job-hunting 

  • Mileage logs  

  • Education expenses 

  • Self-employment expenses 

  • Gambling losses 

  • Child care expenses  

  • Moving expenses  

  • Personal property taxes  

  • Real estate tax bills  

  • And more 

Be thorough. It’s better to have more tax documents than less. 

If you want to get your deductions and credits, it’s imperative that you hand over documentation that proves your expenses. This includes receipts, invoices, medical bills, charitable contributions, IRA contributions, job-hunting expenses, mileage logs, education expenses, self-employment expenses, and more. It’s better to bring too much documentation than too little.

 

Direct Deposit Authorization Form or a Blank Check 

This ensures that when your accountant e-files on your behalf that they are able to directly deposit any federal or state returns. 

 

 

That’s it! You’re now ready to save yourself time and money by heading to your accountant’s office completely prepared. Make sure you go to a certified CPA accountant to ensure that your taxes are done properly and that you get the maximum potential return. 

Any U.S. tax advice contained in the body of this website is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by the recipient for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed under the Internal Revenue Code or applicable state or local tax law provisions.