6 Tax Deductions That Went Extinct in 2018

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The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 was called one of the largest tax overhauls in 30 years. It went into effect at the beginning of 2018, which means taxpayers are starting to feel the impact now. Some households will benefit from it, others will not. Here are some deductions that have been eliminated or reduced.

Moving Expenses
Unless you or a spouse is in the military and is currently on active duty, you won’t be able to take any deductions for moving. In the past, those who moved for a job and paid the moving cost could deduct most of their expenses.

Personal Deductions
Deductions for personal exemptions, which can be worth $4,050 for each exemption, were eliminated and replaced with a larger standard deduction and an expanded child tax credit.

Paying Alimony
If you’re paying alimony on a divorce finalized before December 31, 2019, then you can deduct those payments one last time.

Unreimbursed Job Expenses
This fell into the category of miscellaneous itemized deductions, an area that has been greatly reduced by the latest tax laws. It means that anything an employee pays for while on the job and doesn’t get reimbursed for, is not deductible.

State and Local Taxes
You used to be able to fully deduct any amount of state or local taxes. Now that cap is set at $10,000 meaning those with high state income and property taxes will get much less back.

Tax Preparation Fees
Tax preparation fee deductions were eliminated as part of the miscellaneous fees. This is will occur from 2018-2025. That means you cannot deduct payments to accountant, tax prep firms, or tax preparation software.

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