Personal Finance Tips

3 Tax Benefits for New York Veterans

Current and former members of the military are eligible for certain tax exemptions.

“These exemptions and credits are one small way we can show our gratitude to the brave and dedicated individuals who currently serve or have served in our military,” said Acting Commissioner of Taxation and Finance Nonie Manion in a 2017 press release.

Photo by Benjamin Faust on Unsplash

Photo by Benjamin Faust on Unsplash

In today’s post, we’ll examine a handful of the exemptions available for New York veterans.

Property Tax 

As many as half a million New York veterans benefit from property tax exemptions, many of which are offered by local governments.

Depending on the circumstance, the property tax burden of a wartime veteran could be up to 15% or even as high as 25% if the veteran serves in a combat zone.  Cold War veterans (between 1945 and 1991) could see up to 15% in exemptions.

If the veteran was disabled in the line of duty, they could see up to 50% off in exemptions.

How do these property tax exemptions work?

In September 2017, Gov. Cuomo signed a bill that allowed the 679 school districts the option to allow exemptions for Cold War veterans for the entirety of the time the veteran owns the property. Prior, it was 10 years.

To find out which of these exemptions applies to you, you’ll need to contact your local assessor’s office. Visit NYS’s Municipal Profiles website to get the contact information you need.

Military Pay  

If your permanent home was in NYS before you entered the military, you don’t have to pay income tax on your active-duty pay. But it isn’t quite that simple.

You have to meet ALL three of the following conditions:

  • Didn’t have a permanent home in NY

  • Maintained a permanent abode outside of NY (this excludes military quarters like barracks, BOQ, etc.)

  • Spent less than 30 days in New York during the year

Basically, you need have not lived in New York almost at all for the entirety of the year to be eligible for this perk. You also had to be living somewhere off-base/ship to not owe income taxes.

Hire a Veteran Credit 

There are two types of hire a veteran credit. They are:

  • Corporations subject to franchise tax

  • Individuals, estates and trusts under personal income tax laws

This credit applies if you or your business:

  • Hires a qualified veteran before January 1, 2020

  • Employees the qualified veteran for 35 hours

If the veteran is disabled, the credit is 15% of the total wages paid during the first full year of employment. That amount can’t exceed $15,000 per veteran.

If the veteran isn’t disabled, the credit is10%  of the total wages paid during the first full year of employment. For nondisabled veterans, the credit is capped at $5,000.

These are just a handful of the tax benefits, credits, and exemptions that veterans can take advantage of. Reach out to one of our tax professionals and we’ll ensure you’re getting the most tax benefits from your service.

 

6 FAQs About 529 College Savings Plans

College is a large expense and one worth planning for, especially if you want your future college graduate to start their lives with minimal debt. One common way to prepare for such an expense is to open a 529 college savings plan.

Photo by Ruijia Wang on Unsplash

Photo by Ruijia Wang on Unsplash

What is a 529 plan?

College savings 529 plans are state-sponsored savings accounts that offer both tax and financial aid benefits.

What states run a 529 program?  

Almost every state has a 529 program, each with different perks and benefits. You can pick based on perks and you don’t need to live in the state you opened the account in.

You can look at 529 plan options using this tool from SavingforCollege.com.

What are the two types of college 529 plans?

There are two types of 529 plans, they are:

  • College savings plans – This plan is similar to a Roth 401k or Roth IRA by allowing you to contribute after-tax income in the form of mutual funds and other types of investments. There are a number of investment options to choose from and the 529 account will go up and down and value according to those investment choices. The money is this account is available for tuition, books, and often housing.

  • College prepaid tuition-  This plan can be used to pre-pay all or part of the costs of an in-state public college education. Sometimes, they can be converted for use at private or out-of-state colleges.

What are the perks of using a 529 savings plan?

Each state provides slightly different incentives for its 529 programs. But some of the overall benefits include:

  • Large income tax breaks (for federal and often state taxes)

  • The donor stays in control of the account until its use

  • They’re low maintenance

When can you start them?

You can start one of these savings plans at any time. Most 529 programs are “set it and forget it” meaning the investments come straight out of your paycheck or bank account.

Where can I learn more about college 529 plans?

There are a lot of online resources for comparing and ranking different 529 programs. You can reference one of these, or reach out to your friendly neighborhood tax professionals. We can help you select the best option for you.

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3 Essential Tips for Financial Planning When You Have a Disability

Having a disability is not quite as rare as many people think. In fact, about 14 percent of adults around the world have a disability of some kind. This includes people who have a physical, mental, intellectual, or sensory limitation at a mild, severe, or moderate level. Also, these disabilities could have happened at birth, in old age, or anywhere in between.

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One thing that remains consistent across all forms of disability, however, is that life generally costs more money for those who have them. Normal expenses such as medical care and food, as well as additional costs such as modified housing and assistive devices and technology, can put a major burden on those with disabilities. That’s why it’s essential to have a financial plan in place. If you have a disability, these three tips will help you prepare and form the financial skills it takes to live your best life, both now and in the future.

Consider Life Insurance

One of the first things you should do when planning your finances is to look into life insurance. If you get a policy that benefits your current situation, it could provide significantly for your family if you were to pass away unexpectedly. And life insurance can help cover things like medical expenses, funeral expenses, and lost income. Moreover, shopping for life insurance is fairly straightforward nowadays, as you can easily purchase it online and use online calculators to figure out the coverage you need.

Set a Budget

Much of your financial planning comes down to making a budget. Not only will your budget serve as a guideline for your spending and saving, the process of making a budget will teach you a lot about your financial situation and the steps you can take to grow. If you’re on a fixed income, start with how much you bring in each month. If you are able to work or already have a job, where does that put your monthly income?

Once you factor in your income, write down all of your expenses; include everything you can think of. This might include normal monthly expenses such as your mortgage payment, home and auto insurance, utilities, food, entertainment, gas, etc. Also, consider your medical expenses: How much do you spend on medical care, assistive devices, or any other medical-related expenses? Furthermore, include any credit card debt you want to pay off.

Once you get these basic costs on paper, see where you stand concerning your income and expenses. Then you can determine what you can cut (entertainment, miscellaneous items, etc,) if necessary. Also, be sure to research all your options when it comes to financial assistance.

Build an Emergency Fund

As it is with anyone, saving money is important when you have a disability. Once you figure out your budget, determine how much you can put away in savings. Building an emergency fund will create a safety net in the event that something unexpected happens — whether it’s a medical incident, major home or car repair, or any other kind of sudden expense. Decide on a set amount to put into a cash jar or savings account, and stick to it as close as you can.

There may be many expenses that come with a disability, but that doesn’t mean you can’t navigate them and make a plan that meets your needs and sets you up to be cared for later in life. Work through your finances and set a budget to guide you through your spending and saving. Find the best life insurance plan for you and your family, and start building an emergency fund today. Being financially prepared will help you overcome a lot of challenges and put you in a better position to live a fulfilling life.

 Written by Ed Carter

Any U.S. tax advice contained in the body of this website is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by the recipient for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed under the Internal Revenue Code or applicable state or local tax law provisions.