Tax Reform

Highlights of the New Tax Reform Law

tax reform

 

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The new tax reform law, commonly called the “Tax Cuts and Jobs Act” (TCJA), is the biggest federal tax law overhaul in 31 years, and it has both good and bad news for taxpayers.

Below are highlights of some of the most significant changes affecting individual and business taxpayers. Except where noted, these changes are effective for tax years beginning after December 31, 2017.

Individuals

  • Drops of individual income tax rates ranging from 0 to 4 percentage points (depending on the bracket) to 10%, 12%, 22%, 24%, 32%, 35% and 37% — through 2025
  • Near doubling of the standard deduction to $24,000 (married couples filing jointly), $18,000 (heads of households), and $12,000 (singles and married couples filing separately) — through 2025
  • Elimination of personal exemptions — through 2025
  • Doubling of the child tax credit to $2,000 and other modifications intended to help more taxpayers benefit from the credit — through 2025
  • Elimination of the individual mandate under the Affordable Care Act requiring taxpayers not covered by a qualifying health plan to pay a penalty — effective for months beginning after December 31, 2018
  • Reduction of the adjusted gross income (AGI) threshold for the medical expense deduction to 7.5% for regular and AMT purposes — for 2017 and 2018
  • New $10,000 limit on the deduction for state and local taxes (on a combined basis for property and income taxes; $5,000 for separate filers) — through 2025
  • Reduction of the mortgage debt limit for the home mortgage interest deduction to $750,000 ($375,000 for separate filers), with certain exceptions — through 2025
  • Elimination of the deduction for interest on home equity debt — through 2025
  • Elimination of the personal casualty and theft loss deduction (with an exception for federally declared disasters) — through 2025
  • Elimination of miscellaneous itemized deductions subject to the 2% floor (such as certain investment expenses, professional fees and unreimbursed employee business expenses) — through 2025
  • Elimination of the AGI-based reduction of certain itemized deductions — through 2025
  • Elimination of the moving expense deduction (with an exception for members of the military in certain circumstances) — through 2025
  • Expansion of tax-free Section 529 plan distributions to include those used to pay qualifying elementary and secondary school expenses, up to $10,000 per student per tax year
  • AMT exemption increase, to $109,400 for joint filers, $70,300 for singles and heads of households, and $54,700 for separate filers — through 2025
  • Doubling of the gift and estate tax exemptions, to $10 million (expected to be $11.2 million for 2018 with inflation indexing) — through 2025

 

Businesses

  • Replacement of graduated corporate tax rates ranging from 15% to 35% with a flat corporate rate of 21%
  • Repeal of the 20% corporate AMT
  • New 20% qualified business income deduction for owners of flow-through entities (such as partnerships, limited liability companies and S corporations) and sole proprietorships — through 2025
  • Doubling of bonus depreciation to 100% and expansion of qualified assets to include used assets — effective for assets acquired and placed in service after September 27, 2017, and before January 1, 2023
  • Doubling of the Section 179 expensing limit to $1 million and an increase of the expensing phaseout threshold to $2.5 million
  • Other enhancements to depreciation-related deductions
  • New disallowance of deductions for net interest expense in excess of 30% of the business’s adjusted taxable income (exceptions apply)
  • New limits on net operating loss (NOL) deductions
  • Elimination of the Section 199 deduction, also commonly referred to as the domestic production activities deduction or manufacturers’ deduction — effective for tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, for noncorporate taxpayers and for tax years beginning after December 31, 2018, for C corporation taxpayers
  • New rule limiting like-kind exchanges to real property that is not held primarily for sale
  • New tax credit for employer-paid family and medical leave — through 2019
  • New limitations on excessive employee compensation
  • New limitations on deductions for employee fringe benefits, such as entertainment and, in certain circumstances, meals and transportation

 

More to consider

This is just a brief overview of some of the most significant TCJA provisions. There are additional rules and limits that apply, and the law includes many additional provisions. Contact your tax advisor to learn more about how these and other tax law changes will affect you in 2018 and beyond.

US Senate Presents A Different Take On Tax Reform

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by Mike Godfrey, Tax-News.com, Washington

The Senate Finance Committee released its tax reform plan on November 9, presenting a draft bill with marked differences to that agreed by the House Ways and Means Committee on the same day.

The proposal was drafted by Finance Committee Republicans under the leadership of Senate Finance Committee Chairman Orrin Hatch (R-UT), based on the Unified Tax Framework agreed by the Trump Administration, the House Committee on Ways and Means, and the Senate Committee on Finance in September 2017.

While said to adopt a similar “pro-growth approach” to the House Ways and Means proposal, the Senate plan differs in a number of areas.

The Senate bill would preserve the current seven income tax brackets, compared to the reduced four brackets proposed under the House bill. Under the Senate proposal, the zero tax bracket would be expanded, and a slightly lower 38.5 percent tax rate would be introduced for high-income earners (compared with 39.6 percent in the House Bill, in line with current law).

Both the Senate and House bills include a proposal to double the standard deduction, to USD12,000 for individuals and USD24,000 for married couples; to repeal the Alternative Minimum Tax; and eliminate the state and local tax deductions. Where the House bill would repeal the medical expense deduction, the Senate bill would retain it.

The treatment of the Child Tax Credit is also largely similar in both bills, with the Senate proposing to increase the credit from USD1,000 to USD1,650 (compared to USD1,600 in the House Bill). However, the Senate Bill would preserve the existing mortgage interest deduction, which the House Bill proposes to curb from USD1m to USD500,000.

The Senate bill also proposes to preserve the estate tax, which the House Bill would repeal for persons dying after 2024. The Senate bill also proposes to double both the estate and gift tax exemption for individuals, from USD5m to USD10m.

For businesses, the Senate Bill would also cut the corporate tax cut from 35 percent to 20 percent, but would delay implementation until January 2019. The bill proposes a new 17.4 percent deduction for certain pass-through businesses, which are taxed under the personal income tax regime, and enhanced Section 179 expensing. There is an exclusion from the deduction for specified service businesses, except in the case of a taxpayer whose taxable income does not exceed USD150,000, for married individuals filing jointly, or USD75,000 for other individuals.

The Senate Bill would tax multinationals’ offshore holdings under a repatriation tax proposal at lower rates than under the House bill. Cash holdings would be subject to a repatriation tax of five percent, rather than seven percent under the House proposal, and at 10 percent on non-cash holdings, rather than 14 percent as under the House proposal.

Both bills would cap the deduction for net interest expenses at 30 percent of adjusted taxable income, with exclusions for small businesses.

“This is just the start of the legislative process in the Senate. We expect robust committee debate on the policies in this bill, will have an open amendment process, and hope to report legislation by the end of next week,” said Hatch.

Trump Looks To Democrats To Shore Up Tax Reform Push

Westchester NY accountant Paul Herman of Herman & Company CPA’s is here for all your financial needs. Please contact us if you have questions, and to receive your free personal finance consultation!

by Mike Godfrey, Tax-News.com, Washington

 US President Donald Trump has reached out to Democrat lawmakers to discuss tax reform, in a bid to obtain bipartisan support to get a package through Congress.

The President met with senators Heidi Heitkamp (D-ND), Joe Donnelly (D-ID), and Joe Manchin (D-WV) over dinner on September 12 to discuss possible support for a tax reform bill.

“I will tell you, for the tax bill, I would be very surprised if I don’t have at least a few Democrats,” Trump told reporters following the dinner.

The White House and Congress have so far failed to propose a joint comprehensive tax plan, despite months of negotiations. Trump has indicated that, if some members of the Republican party hold back reform, he may try to instead bring on board Democrat lawmakers to push through a bipartisan bill.

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