Tax Tip

Ensuring Your Year-End Donations Are Tax-Deductible

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Westchester NY accountant Paul Herman of Herman & Company CPA’s is here for all your financial needs. Please contact us if you have questions, and to receive your free personal finance consultation!

Many people make donations at the end of the year. To be deductible on your 2017 return, a charitable donation must be made by December 31, 2017. According to the IRS, a donation generally is “made” at the time of its “unconditional delivery.” But what does this mean?

Is it the date you write a check or charge an online gift to your credit card? Or is it the date the charity actually receives the funds? In practice, the delivery date depends in part on what you donate and how you donate it. Here are a few common examples:

Checks. The date you mail it.

Credit cards. The date you make the charge.

Pay-by-phone accounts. The date the financial institution pays the amount.

Stock certificates. The date you mail the properly endorsed stock certificate to the charity.

To be deductible, a donation must be made to a “qualified charity” — one that’s eligible to receive tax-deductible contributions. The IRS’s online search tool, “Exempt Organizations (EO) Select Check,” can help you more easily find out whether an organization is eligible to receive tax-deductible charitable contributions. You can access it at https://www.irs.gov/charities-non-profits/exempt-organizations-select-check. Information about organizations eligible to receive deductible contributions is updated monthly.

Many additional rules apply to the charitable donation deduction, so please contact us if you have questions about the deductibility of a gift you’ve made or are considering making. But act soon — you don’t have much time left to make donations that will reduce your 2017 tax bill.

IRS Says No Decision Yet On 2018 Filing Season Dates

Westchester NY accountant Paul Herman of Herman & Company CPA’s is here for all your financial needs. Please contact us if you have questions, and to receive your free personal finance consultation!

by Mike Godfrey, Tax-News.com, Washington

No date has yet been set for the filing of individual tax returns in 2018, despite rumors to the contrary, according to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

In a statement on November 3, 2017, the agency confirmed that it is currently updating its programming and processing systems for the coming tax year, as well as continuing to monitor legislative changes that could affect the 2018 tax filing season.

These include the possible renewal of 36 “extender” tax provisions that expired at the end of 2016, which cover renewable energy tax incentives, a couple of homeowner provisions, and a variety of miscellaneous minor provisions including tax credits for electric vehicles, special expensing allowances for media productions, and employment tax credits for Native Americans.

“The IRS anticipates it will not be at a point to announce a filing season start date until later in the calendar year,” it said in a statement. “Speculation on the internet that the IRS will begin accepting tax returns on January 22 or after the Martin Luther King Jr Day holiday in January is inaccurate and misleading; no such date has been set.”

Success story: Victim of Preparer Fraud Receives Refund

Westchester NY accountant Paul Herman of Herman & Company CPA’s is here for all your financial needs. Please contact us if you have questions, and to receive your free personal finance consultation!

Every year the Taxpayer Advocate Service (TAS) helps thousands of people with tax problems. This story is only one of many examples of how TAS helps resolve taxpayer issues. All personal details are removed to protect the privacy of the taxpayer.

TAS advocated on behalf of a taxpayer who was the victim of tax return preparer fraud. The taxpayer was very frustrated, since the first time she became aware of the fraud was when the IRS sent her a balance due notice on her tax return. TAS advocated for her by submitting all of the appropriate documentation to the IRS. It took significant efforts by TAS to get the IRS to recognize the taxpayer as a victim of preparer fraud. Ultimately, TAS was able to get the taxpayer’s account corrected and the balance due amount removed. The TAS office was relentless in making sure the taxpayer received the proper refund and that she was not held responsible for the refund the preparer received.

When working with the Taxpayer Advocate Service, each individual or business taxpayer is assigned to an advocate who listens to the problem and helps the taxpayer understand what needs to be done to resolve their tax issue. TAS advocates will do everything they can to help taxpayers and work with them every step of the way. Occasionally we feature stories of taxpayers and advocates who work together to resolve complex tax issues. Read more TAS success stories.

Learn more about TAS eligibility: https://taxpayeradvocate.irs.gov/about-us/learn-more-eligibility 

Any U.S. tax advice contained in the body of this website is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by the recipient for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed under the Internal Revenue Code or applicable state or local tax law provisions.