irs

4 Ways to Pay Less Taxes on Your Investments

If you’re considering jumping into investing (or have already started), you need to know the tactics to avoid paying massive amounts of taxes on them. We’ve compiled a list of tax tips for investors. Check them out.

by Austin Distel

Hold investments for longer than a year

Whenever you make money off your investments (aka capital gains) you are taxed on that income. However, the length of time you held the investment dictates the rate you’ll be taxed at.

These taxes, called capital gains taxes, change at the year mark. If you hold your investments for a year or less, you’ll be taxed at the short term capital gains rate, which is the same rate as income tax.

But if you hold your investments for a year and a day, you’ll get taxed at a more manageable long-term capital gains rate.

This rate can get as high as 20% for big earners, but it’s more likely you’ll pay somewhere between 0 and 15%.

Buy Municipal Bonds  

Buying bonds means you get to collect interest on those bonds, which is a great source of passive income if you buy enough.

But unless you buy municipal bonds, the IRS is entitled to a share of that interest. When you buy either city, state, or county bonds, you are exempt from paying federal income tax on those bonds. If you buy municipal bonds in your home state, you’ll be exempt from state and local taxes as well.

One thing to note is that if you sell your municipal bonds for a profit, you’ll have to pay taxes on the gain.

Sell Losing Investments   

If you’re losing money on a particular investment, you might want to consider selling it off.  Investment losses offset capital gains, so if you make $2,000 and lose the same amount, you won’t have to pay on the amount you’ve lost.

In addition, if your investment losses exceed your gains, you can use them to offset up to $3,000 in taxable income.

Put Your Money in Tax Sheltered Accounts  

Putting your investment money into tax-sheltered accounts is a great way to defer paying taxes on various investments.

Accounts like 401(k)s, 403(b)s, and certain IRA plans aren’t tax-free, but you won’t have to worry about paying taxes until you start making withdrawals. By the time you do that (barring some emergency), you’ll likely be in a lower tax bracket anyway.

 

Have more questions about investments and taxes? Shoot us an email or give us a call.

Are you withholding enough from your taxes?

witholdings

In a prior article, we talk about how moonlighters (those with 1099s and a W2 job) might need to withhold more taxes from their W2 role to avoid owing for the 2019 year.

They aren’t the only ones. Retirees, those with dependents, and a handful of others will need to take a look at how much they’re withholding and adjust accordingly.

Basically, if you were surprised at how low your refund was this year, you might need to adjust your withholding amount. That means if your refund was low or you owed (and never did before) you need to prioritize your withholding amount.

The time to adjust is now, right after the April 15 tax preparation deadline. The longer you wait, the more likely it is that you’ll owe or get a low tax refund amount. This can mostly be done with the IRS withholding calculator, but you’ll likely need to talk to an accountant for proper withholding.

This is for two reasons:

  • State and local taxes aren’t calculated.
  • Without a full understanding of taxes, taxpayers may not fill out the calculator correctly.

Reach out to a tax professional. They’ll help you navigate the muddy waters that were caused by the latest tax bill change.

Additionally, the IRS is cooking up a new W4 form - the form you fill out at the beginning of conventional employment (where you’d receive a W2) or to adjust your withholding amount. It will be ready for the 2020 tax season and won’t affect this year’s taxes.

If you ended up owing in this year or had a small tax refund, reach out to us. We can help ensure you’re withholding enough.

IRS Says No Decision Yet On 2018 Filing Season Dates

Westchester NY accountant Paul Herman of Herman & Company CPA’s is here for all your financial needs. Please contact us if you have questions, and to receive your free personal finance consultation!

by Mike Godfrey, Tax-News.com, Washington

No date has yet been set for the filing of individual tax returns in 2018, despite rumors to the contrary, according to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).

In a statement on November 3, 2017, the agency confirmed that it is currently updating its programming and processing systems for the coming tax year, as well as continuing to monitor legislative changes that could affect the 2018 tax filing season.

These include the possible renewal of 36 “extender” tax provisions that expired at the end of 2016, which cover renewable energy tax incentives, a couple of homeowner provisions, and a variety of miscellaneous minor provisions including tax credits for electric vehicles, special expensing allowances for media productions, and employment tax credits for Native Americans.

“The IRS anticipates it will not be at a point to announce a filing season start date until later in the calendar year,” it said in a statement. “Speculation on the internet that the IRS will begin accepting tax returns on January 22 or after the Martin Luther King Jr Day holiday in January is inaccurate and misleading; no such date has been set.”

Any U.S. tax advice contained in the body of this website is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by the recipient for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed under the Internal Revenue Code or applicable state or local tax law provisions.