personal finances

Beat These 5 Financial Challenges

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By Bankrate

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A number of signs indicate the U.S. economy is improving. They include soaring consumer confidence, highs for the stock market, and the low unemployment rate (most recently 4.5 percent).

At the same time, financial obstacles remain for many Americans. A new survey from the National Foundation for Credit Counseling underscores some of these ongoing challenges.

Common financial obstacles and how to overcome them

I picked some of the biggest challenges highlighted in the survey and added some advice on how to fight back if you’re going through them.

Rising credit card debt

Thirty-nine percent of respondents carry credit card debt from month to month, compared with 35 percent last year. Some 16 percent of adults say they carry $2,500 or more in credit card debt every month.

What you should do: Pay off as much as you can now. Benchmark interest rates are on the rise, and the Federal Reserve has indicated that rates are likely heading higher this year. So credit card debt is going to get more expensive. Consider getting a balance transfer card to reduce the interest you’re paying.

Student loan strains

Among respondents, 11 percent wouldn’t recommend student loans to finance college education, the same percentage as last year. Those who said their student loan was a good investment rose a bit to 9 percent, compared with just 6 percent over the previous two years.

What you should do: If you’re saddled with student debt, make larger payments if you can afford it. Also, have a percentage of your income automatically directed toward a college repayment fund so you won’t be tempted to use the money on something else. Check out this calculator that shows you how long it will take you to pay off your student loans based on varying factors.

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People saving less

Some 54 percent said they are saving the same as last year, down 4 percentage points from last year. The percentage of those saving more is unchanged at 26 percent. Meanwhile, 68 percent say non-retirement saving has decreased slightly over the past year.

What you should do: First, monitor your spending and make a budget. Then, make sure you’re getting the most from your accounts. Compare rates on savings accounts and CDs to make sure you’re getting a competitive return. Also, set up a direct deposit to transfer funds into your savings account.

Not saving for retirement

Among respondents, 27 percent aren’t saving any portion of household income for retirement. That’s little changed from last year. Asked about what areas of their finances worry them most, the top response was retiring without having enough money set aside.

What you should do: If your employer offers a 401(k) and matches a percentage of your contributions, make sure you’re taking advantage of the full match. Look over your current investments to make sure you’re not being charged high fees. Once a year, increase the amount you contribute by 1 or 2 percentage points at a time.

Need professional advice

A whopping 80 percent of U.S. adults say they could benefit from professional advice and answers to everyday financial questions.

Paul S. Herman CPA, a tax expert for individuals and businesses, is the founder of Herman & Company, CPA’s PC in White Plains, New York.  He provides guidance and strategies to improve clients’ financial well-being.

Any U.S. tax advice contained in the body of this website is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by the recipient for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed under the Internal Revenue Code or applicable state or local tax law provisions.