Taxes

4 Ways to Pay Less Taxes on Your Investments

If you’re considering jumping into investing (or have already started), you need to know the tactics to avoid paying massive amounts of taxes on them. We’ve compiled a list of tax tips for investors. Check them out.

by Austin Distel

Hold investments for longer than a year

Whenever you make money off your investments (aka capital gains) you are taxed on that income. However, the length of time you held the investment dictates the rate you’ll be taxed at.

These taxes, called capital gains taxes, change at the year mark. If you hold your investments for a year or less, you’ll be taxed at the short term capital gains rate, which is the same rate as income tax.

But if you hold your investments for a year and a day, you’ll get taxed at a more manageable long-term capital gains rate.

This rate can get as high as 20% for big earners, but it’s more likely you’ll pay somewhere between 0 and 15%.

Buy Municipal Bonds  

Buying bonds means you get to collect interest on those bonds, which is a great source of passive income if you buy enough.

But unless you buy municipal bonds, the IRS is entitled to a share of that interest. When you buy either city, state, or county bonds, you are exempt from paying federal income tax on those bonds. If you buy municipal bonds in your home state, you’ll be exempt from state and local taxes as well.

One thing to note is that if you sell your municipal bonds for a profit, you’ll have to pay taxes on the gain.

Sell Losing Investments   

If you’re losing money on a particular investment, you might want to consider selling it off.  Investment losses offset capital gains, so if you make $2,000 and lose the same amount, you won’t have to pay on the amount you’ve lost.

In addition, if your investment losses exceed your gains, you can use them to offset up to $3,000 in taxable income.

Put Your Money in Tax Sheltered Accounts  

Putting your investment money into tax-sheltered accounts is a great way to defer paying taxes on various investments.

Accounts like 401(k)s, 403(b)s, and certain IRA plans aren’t tax-free, but you won’t have to worry about paying taxes until you start making withdrawals. By the time you do that (barring some emergency), you’ll likely be in a lower tax bracket anyway.

 

Have more questions about investments and taxes? Shoot us an email or give us a call.

Important Dates In Post-Revolution American Tax History

The Revolutionary War was sparked in part by the British imposing taxes on the American colonists without their permission or consent.

Once the colonists had freed themselves from British rule, it was time to establish a government that could pay the debts it had incurred during the conflict.

Photo by Patrick Fore on Unsplash

Photo by Patrick Fore on Unsplash

1777 – Articles of Confederation

This was the first constitution of the newly formed United State. It favored decentralization of power, which means that Congress was not given the power to tax.

1781  – Report on Public Credit

Robert Morris, Superintendent of finance, wanted the federal government to own the debt it incurred then issue interest-bearing debt certificates while imposing tariffs and internal taxes.

His proposal was shut down by numerous states over the next few years.

1787 – Ratification of the Constitution

The ratification of the Constitution shifted the focus of power to the federal government and away from individual states.

This gave the federal legislature the power to impose tariffs and coin money, along with the flexibility to collect excises and levy taxes directly on individual citizens.

1789 – Tariff of 1789

This tax bill included the original 5% duty on imports, as well as a list of special items that would be taxed at specific amounts.

1790 – Report on Public Credit

This new tax plan worked on two basic principles:

  • Redemption – Congress would redeem at face value all the securities issued by the Confederation government. These old notes would be exchanged for new government securities with interest of about 4%. This plan aimed to intertwine the wealthy Americans who had financed the initial government with the new government.

  • Assumption – The national government would take on outstanding war debts of the states. This would concentrate the nation wealth into the hands of the wealthy merchant class so they would be able to invest in the nation’s economy and other critical innovations.

1791 – Whiskey Excise Tax

This was a tax specifically for spirit distillers and imposed a 7 cents to 18 cent per gallon tax. This was not a popular tax, as spirits were often used as a form of currency out west.

1794 – Uprising Quelled

North Carolina and Western Pennsylvania were in a state of civil unrest after being cited by the federal government for dodging taxes.

The federal government forced the states to send militia to occupy these territories and take down any organized resistance.

President Madison appealed to Congress for a Declaration of War against Britain as the tension between the two countries reached a head.

There was a lot of conflict over fundraising for the war, but Congress eventually settled on doubling the tariff schedule.

 

6 Tax Deductions That Went Extinct in 2018

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The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 was called one of the largest tax overhauls in 30 years. It went into effect at the beginning of 2018, which means taxpayers are starting to feel the impact now. Some households will benefit from it, others will not. Here are some deductions that have been eliminated or reduced.

Moving Expenses
Unless you or a spouse is in the military and is currently on active duty, you won’t be able to take any deductions for moving. In the past, those who moved for a job and paid the moving cost could deduct most of their expenses.

Personal Deductions
Deductions for personal exemptions, which can be worth $4,050 for each exemption, were eliminated and replaced with a larger standard deduction and an expanded child tax credit.

Paying Alimony
If you’re paying alimony on a divorce finalized before December 31, 2019, then you can deduct those payments one last time.

Unreimbursed Job Expenses
This fell into the category of miscellaneous itemized deductions, an area that has been greatly reduced by the latest tax laws. It means that anything an employee pays for while on the job and doesn’t get reimbursed for, is not deductible.

State and Local Taxes
You used to be able to fully deduct any amount of state or local taxes. Now that cap is set at $10,000 meaning those with high state income and property taxes will get much less back.

Tax Preparation Fees
Tax preparation fee deductions were eliminated as part of the miscellaneous fees. This is will occur from 2018-2025. That means you cannot deduct payments to accountant, tax prep firms, or tax preparation software.

Any U.S. tax advice contained in the body of this website is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used, by the recipient for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed under the Internal Revenue Code or applicable state or local tax law provisions.